Author Topic: [ORIGINAL]Llew Llaw Gyffes Rest [PG] [one-shot]  (Read 175 times)

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Offline magicflute

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[ORIGINAL]Llew Llaw Gyffes Rest [PG] [one-shot]
« on: Fri, Jun 15, 2007, 10:23 AM »
[Original]LLEW LLAW GYFFES REST[PG]FIN
Author- Magicflute
Title- Llew Llaw Gyffes Rest
Rating- PG
Fandom- Original.
Disclaimer- For once I don't need one. I've invented everything in here he he he.
Summary- It's sort of a modern fairytale with celtic elements...
Pairing- There is no really a pairing, most of the story is about kids...
Archive- Sure
Feedback- Please gimme. This is very different from what I usually write, so I'm kinda curious what you think... for one, there is no talk about sex whatsoever, but one mention of character death.
Author's notes - I really have no idea whatsoever what to write in here today.


Llew Llaw Gyffes Rest

They were just standing there. Rows and rows of trees on the frontier of sea and earth. They should have played home to endangered birds, or rabbits or squirrels, but they seemed as empty as the marshland struggling to keep the sea from nibbling and stealing soggy earth year after year in its slow progression. Actually there weren’t any birds in the sky either, nor fish in the water. No insect. No life. There was not even that typical, salty, little wind blowing from the sea to the coast, you know the kind of wind; it gives your lips a bitter taste of tears. If not for the quiet lapping of the waves, there would have been nothing, and nothing was the color gray. The disturbingly empty sky was as gray as the dark waters reflecting it.
It was a landscape with its soul gone missing, it was music gone bland and dull. It was death viewed through a dirty window.

The children called it Llew Llaw Gyffes Rest and they whispered that it was the grave of a great hero, one who had known a great King, perhaps even King Gwydion himself, but none of them wanted to play there, as the marsh was unforgiving and soggy and clung to their legs with strong, cold, clammy hands seeking to keep them until the tide comes in and over the centuries, many a straying lamb had found an early death in its embrace.

There was no place I hated more.

* - * - *

"Can you keep a secret, Anna?"

I remember my instant excitement. Mikahla O'Bannon had a secret and it was to me that he was going to tell it . Nevertheless, I did not reply at once. I put two more of the small, perfumed, yellow apples I just had gathered in the basket and bent down for more.

Father Molloy had promised to give me one of his hand carved wooden toys for my little brother Jamey, if I helped with the harvest and enough apples for my sister Jenny Lee to make one of her famous apple tarts, and Jenny Lee's apple tarts were a piece of heaven indeed as she served them ovenwarm, topped with sour cream and sprinkled with brown sugar.

"Hold the basket for me, Mikey," I told him and threw in two more apples. He crouched down in front of me and his gray eyes were grave as he looked at me beneath his mop of glossy, black hair.

"You know that I don't like that name, don't you, Princess?" he said and took hold of my basket. I looked away at his big, tanned hands and blushed and smiled. For a ten-year old boy, Mikalah had the biggest hands you can imagine. He was all gray  eyes, big hands and big feet, large shoulders and long legs and at his birthday party I even heard his mother tell Jenny Lee that if he kept growing at that rate, one day Mikalah  O'Bannon was going to be taller than Cuchulain himself. I had believed her, to me, Mikey O'Bannon always had been God.

"Can you keep a secret for me, Anna?" he asked again and  watched me throw the last apple in the nearly full basket. I nodded, shy again. I always felt shy around him. When I was all grown up like Jenny Lee I wanted to marry him, but I would never, ever dare telling him that. He just would have to figure it out by himself.

He leaned forward until I had to look into his storm colored eyes and lowered his voice, "I know where it is, Anna. I have found it. Llew Law Gyffes grave."

It was then, that I did the most awful, the most terrible thing in my whole life. The thing I will never forgive myself for doing. I laughed.

"You never! You're telling stories again." Mickey O'Bannon told the most marvelous stories when he wanted. He could have talked a dog into giving up its bone if he wanted to. So, of course,  I did not believe him. Nobody had ever found that grave, it was just a legend!

"I did too!" Mickey's face screwed up in annoyance and his chin thrust forward and his eyes threw lightning bolts at me and I started to believe him. "And I'll prove it to you!"

I just looked at him, because, by now, I was very curious to learn how he was going to prove such a thing to me. He was earnest again, he looked nearly reverent, as if he remembered something. Something important. Then he decided, "I'll go there, tonight, and I'll bring you back his helmet, and then you'll have to believe me. I have found his grave, Anna, and there is a big shield and a helmet with a funny picture on it and everything, just like in the stories."

Now I was frightened. Llew Law Gyffes Rest was a dangerous and scary enough place by day, but our parents had forbidden us to ever go near the marsh after nightfall and I agreed with them. Going there by night was unthinkable. I had never heard of such a thing before, even if I knew that Mr Finnigan had lost two sheep in the marsh last year and almost lost his old dog Fanny as well. But Mikalah was so much smarter and courageous than a sheep. Surely, nothing like that could ever happen to him? After all he was already ten, he was very old, why, he was practically a man in my seven year old eyes.

"Did you see his sword?" I had heard that the sword was made of gold and that he had given it to King Gawain, but you never know, perhaps he got it back before he was buried.

He looked a little uncertain. "No sword, it's probably buried deeper."

"Can I come?" I asked him but I already knew the answer and, to tell the truth, I was not courageous like Mikalah, I did not really want to go out by night, and see a dead man and his helmet and get punished by Jenny Lee, and loose all chances of getting any apple tart until Christmas and beyond.

"No Princess. Your sister would cut off my head and feed it to Old Man Finnigan's Fanny and where would we be then? I'll bring you the helmet tomorrow, I promise. But you have to promise me that you won't tell."

"A promise is a debt," I told him. "Now you really have to come back."

He laughed at me, that full-bodied, barking laugh he had, happy, that I would keep his secret and he carried my basket all the way to Father Molloy, who gave me the wooden toy and apples and who gave Mikey some apples as well, because he was a 'growing boy.'

That very same night, Mikalah O'Bannon went to look for Llew Llaw Gyffes' helmet and was never seen again.

Yesterday morning, Jamie Finnegan's dog (a great-grand daughter of Fanny) dug up the remains of a german soldier and his helmet had a not so funny picture of a swastika on it. It was a great find and the city's newspaper did an article on it with a picture of Jamie and his dog and the hole in the marsh. Over the years, I thought that I had no more tears to spill, but there were. There were.

Yesterday night I dreamt about Mickey; he was holding the helmet in his hand and he was beautiful and had grown to be that tall man his mother had seen in him and he told me with a stranger's deep voice, "A promise is a debt, Anna."

Perhaps I will see him again, tonight, at Llew Law Gyffes Rest.

(The End.)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by magicflute »

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Offline LouRose

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« Reply #1 on: Thu, Jun 21, 2007, 02:17 AM »
I just read this now and it struck me how good it was.
When you first posted this I looked it over and that was it, but just took 20 minutes to read it thoroughly through and it's a sweet, terrifying tale.

Kind of reminds me a bit of Pan's Labyrinth.
It a beautiful fairy world, with the cruelty of the real world.

Well written Flute  :kiss
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by LouRose »
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Offline magicflute

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« Reply #2 on: Thu, Jun 21, 2007, 05:02 AM »
Quote from: "LouRose"
I just read this now and it struck me how good it was.
When you first posted this I looked it over and that was it, but just took 20 minutes to read it thoroughly through and it's a sweet, terrifying tale.

Kind of reminds me a bit of Pan's Labyrinth.
It a beautiful fairy world, with the cruelty of the real world.

Well written Flute  :kiss
That's precisely the spirit I tried to convey - sort of a half modern fairy tale with dark fantasy elements, you nailed that down perfectly. I'm glad that somebody took the time to read slowly... :cry

« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by magicflute »

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