Author Topic: An Article On Critiquing. Please Read.  (Read 6078 times)

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Offline Rachel

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« Reply #30 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 01:45 PM »
You know what puts me off being so honest?

I was honest on another board with someone - she asked for honest feedback and I gave it (and if you know me at all, you will know I am never nasty) and she took it completely the wrong way and went for my throat. Yet she had said that she wanted honest feedback, good or bad.

I am always very polite in my feedback but I yearn to be able to tell people honestly what I think, but after that episode...well...so I only give honest feedback now when someone actually values my opinion and asks for it.
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by Rachel »

Offline Nicolina

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« Reply #31 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 01:57 PM »
I think an author and a potential reviewer needs to test each other out a little, on a slightly lower level, before they get too heavy with the critique.

That is really depressing to have such a response, did the two of you ever recover from it?
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by Nicolina »

Offline Rachel

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« Reply #32 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 02:07 PM »
Quote from: "Nicolina"
That is really depressing to have such a response, did the two of you ever recover from it?



Nope, I hardly ever visit the other site at all now thanks to the bitchy reply I got. If she didn't want an honest answer, why ask for one? It seemed like she only wanted a honest reply as long as everyone said how wonderful she was...trouble was, she had little knowledge of the character she was writing about, her grammar and punctuation were terrible and even before the end of the first chapter it was the same as a dozen others...no originality.

I know for a fact she is still turning out the same stuff as I occasionally go to see if she took anything on board, but no she hasn't.
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by Rachel »

Offline evilgrin

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« Reply #33 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 02:13 PM »
I've had that happen too Rachel.
sometimes people say they want you to be honest, but secretly it's only as long as yer saying what they want to be hearing, and, once they don't hear that, they can take it very personally.
and yes, Nic, sometimes it's a little bit of testing, because we don't really know each other, and it can be really easy to hurt another's feelings online, when you can't see someone face to face, or maybe something that you thought was funny or witty comes off as being, well, not very nice.
for 33, the times when we DON'T get a response to our feedback is interesting too, sort of like feedback on feedback.
are they ignoring you just because they're ignoring you?
because they haven't read it?
because they never respond to feedback?
are they supremely pissed off at you for what you wrote and have just chosen to not read or respond to you ever?
did the writer ever write anything again?
This may be odd, but I look at reading/responding as a sort of a relationship, a marriage if you will.
you have to talk, that's true, you have to communicate and be honest. But you also have to remember that you have to go to sleep at night, and that person is going to be there the next day. If you're cruel or petty or nagging, and make constant demands on a writer to change this, do that, I didn't like that and you should have done this instead, then you're not going to have a nice marriage with that writer.
in cases like that, where it seems that you can't find redeeming qualities, it might be best to just end it clean, and not read that writers work anymore
EG:)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by evilgrin »

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It was a rainy night in the big city. A hard rain. Hard enough to wash the scum off the streets. And I'm stuck in it without an umbrella. What a tool.

Offline Nicolina

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« Reply #34 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 02:13 PM »
Care to tell me which site, Rachel? Maybe in a PM if you prefer. An which story and reply it was.

Nic.
« Last Edit: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 02:46 PM by Nicolina »

Offline 33andHolding

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When did honesty become so hard?
« Reply #35 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 02:29 PM »
Rachel - I so feel your angst. In RL, honesty is a trait I am known for, but in regard to feedback, it seems to be a black and murky pool of unknown.

I agree also, that the phrasing 'Let me have it', is often meant to read 'as long as it is good'.

In general, I am a nice person, sometimes too much so.

It was never my intention to upset anyone.

In my feedback I was specific about it not being the author or the writing in general. If I didn't care for either I most likely would have just backed out of the thread and not returned.

EG, I agree with you as well. My comments were a first, and like I said rather mild. I would never morph into a bitch, it is not my style. There has been no response to any of the feedback left at the time I left mine, so the outcome is hard to decipher.

My hope is that it does not turn out like Rachel's situation and I alienate a ton of people in the process and in turn feel honesty is not worth it.

Time will tell.

It so damn tricky!

Jenn
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by 33andHolding »

Offline evilgrin

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« Reply #36 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 02:36 PM »
and that's it, it's really tricky, a murky black pool at best.
sometimes, when I DO leave harder feedback, I will mention right off the bat that it WAS asked for.
just like writers themselves though, if we get no feedback on our feedback, how do we know how it was taken?
I know that we all have a spot at the entry of our stories requesting feedback, or not, but I still think it wouldn't hurt to maybe start a thread where people can ask for more detailed feedback? I know I don't always refer to the author's blurb at the top. Maybe if it was specifically asked for somewhere, it's sort of a way to cover yer ass, because you could say, hey knock off the crying, you asked for it?
on the flip side of that, writers that DON'T want to be ripped apart could say that they didn't ask for that treatment.
BECAUSE it's such a murky game to play, I don't think it would hurt to be careful.
EG:)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by evilgrin »

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It was a rainy night in the big city. A hard rain. Hard enough to wash the scum off the streets. And I'm stuck in it without an umbrella. What a tool.

Offline x-fuse

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« Reply #37 on: Mon, Jun 05, 2006, 09:04 PM »
Quote
We should say in our 'Feedback' requirement whether we wish to recieve a detailed critique and whether we would prefer it by PM or on the board.



That still won’t work. On just about ever-single board or site I have been on I have responded to at least one person who wished to have an ‘honest’ opinion of their fic. I gave them truthful feedback and I can only remember two times where I wasn’t attacked.

As for a separate thread to request harder feedback, it’s still not going to work. The board that I refuse to name did something like that and well I was the evil bitch again for daring to say that someone’s fic made no sense. What the people wanted is ‘that was good but you should have used he came instead of he was here.’

You used to be able to give some useful feedback (not to say good feedback isn’t useful. It’s ego building) and it will not change not unless the mods and admin is willing to put up and referee some major hostiles. And some people who are willing to actually get up and say that the OFCs are Mary Sues and the plot made no sense. The sad part is as new young fans come in they except the type of feedback to be the norm and keep turning out the same fics without knowing any different.
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by x-fuse »

"It's always fun to torment people...under the guise of being creative." - James Morrison

Offline evilgrin

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« Reply #38 on: Tue, Jun 06, 2006, 06:24 AM »
have you ever had anyone savage your work?
we're not talking nice feedback all the time, there are some people that really get their jollies doing hatchet jobs on people. I just think that if you're going to allow people to do that, then it should be something the writer has asked for, not just someone looking for a vicarious thrill by being nasty to someone from the safety of an anonymous room.
there's "honest", and then there's "vicious"
some people simply choose to hold their tongues about it until specifically asked. I don't see that that should be a problem.
I wouldn't envy any mod having to be a referee for that kind of garbage, and that's quickly what it would become.
we're talking personal tastes here, and that's always going to be subjective
EG:)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by evilgrin »

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It was a rainy night in the big city. A hard rain. Hard enough to wash the scum off the streets. And I'm stuck in it without an umbrella. What a tool.

Offline 33andHolding

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« Reply #39 on: Tue, Jun 06, 2006, 12:47 PM »
My personal experience as of now…

The person, who I like, has responded in kind and appreciated, or said so, my honesty. The topic in question was not mentioned, and that is her prerogative. I will not bring up the matter again. That is all.

Will I do this again? Not sure.

It seems to me that everything in the world of the internet is subjective. We don’t know each other. What a person truly wants or needs is gray to us because of that.

Do ‘we’ always type what we mean? Are the alliances, so to speak, that we form for real, or are they made with only those who makes us feel comfortable?

I don’t think that there is any definite answer to these questions. There are too damn many different people at work to form specific guidelines.

The question is not how to leave ‘good’ feedback; we all know how to do that. But more curious, is why should we do it.

So, this topic is back at square one.



To x-fuse…

There is something I must say to you. It has been on my mind for months and it must be addressed.

You left feedback, not the glowing, fuzzy kind, for a friend of mine. This was about four or so months ago. My response to that was juvenile, to say the least. After a four-day, three-night trip to Vegas, the day I got home was not the best time for me to be posting anything. I typed without thinking, and that is never wise. Is that an excuse? No, there is none. I wanted to PM you to apologize, but thought that was a cowardly way to go about it. My stupidity was ‘out there’ for anyone to read. Making a private apology seemed weak. So, here it is in thread, for anyone to read.

 – I am sorry for the way I reacted to your feedback. You were entirely within your right, and I was wrong.

You did exactly what we are discussing in this thread, and I alone helped prove your point. Ashamed seems like a good word here. Without my apology, hypocrite fits too.


To specifically try and hurt someone’s feelings is vicious.

That word alone speaks volumes.
 
NOT COOL and UNACCEPTABLE.

Basically, it all boils down to this: To each their own.

I love this board and everyone associated with it. But, this thread could be debated from now until the end of time, with no clear resolution.

So, hugs to you all and do whatever you think best!

Jenn
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by 33andHolding »

Offline evilgrin

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« Reply #40 on: Tue, Jun 06, 2006, 12:57 PM »
"to each their own"
that really does say it all
people like all different kinds of stories, and there are as many different kinds of stories as their are writers out there.
you're right that a lot of this is subjective, the thing of it is, when you're dealing with something someone has created, it's like walking into a minefield.
I just think that if you're going to do that, it should be something agreed on by both parties.
I have seen some absolutely brutal savage attacks, and there really is no other way to put that, directed against other writers.
so far I haven't seen that here
it hurt me just to see that
I don't mean in a "oh, that's not nice" kind of way, I felt real pain for the person that would wake up, and go to their board, and have to open that up and look at it. To have it done publicly, where everyone else can stand and look at how you've been hurt?
I can't even imagine what that writer must have felt.
I've spoken to two people it's happened to.
One woman never wrote anything again
I don't see who that serves
It takes guts to put what you've written out for people to see. It takes courage. But it shouldn't have to take that much courage.
Like so many other things, I don't think asking for consent to do it is too much to ask
EG:)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by evilgrin »

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It was a rainy night in the big city. A hard rain. Hard enough to wash the scum off the streets. And I'm stuck in it without an umbrella. What a tool.

Offline Nicolina

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« Reply #41 on: Tue, Jun 06, 2006, 01:21 PM »
33AndHolding, very brave of you to come forward like that!

It is true that sometimes we write something that we could have and would have expressed in a more delicate manner in RL but in writing it turns out to be harsher than intended. We all need to be careful and considerate. At least that is what I try to be. I can't be the judge of that, though. :confused

It is also very, very true that we don't know each other here, on the boards, with a few exceptions, of course. Sometimes we think that we have figured someone out and then they turn out to react and behave differently than you would have and it makes you realize the friendship was only superficial. With that in mind, though, I have found that 'life' here on the boards I visit, and the interaction with some people here has enriched my (writing-)life. A lot. And sometimes I've learnt real lessons, for life. It is great to be able to ask a Southern Belle what it was like during the hurricane, or what a certain expression means in depth, culture-wise.

A few days ago I had a similar discussion (in RL!)with a 15 year old girl (I'm 37) and she had already learned the lesson the hard way that internet friends are more or less imaginary, even if she had spent some time in RL with a few of these people. Turned out they didn't have a lot in common, and it had been disappointing - naturally.

So, bottom line? I don't know. Be yourself?! But don't leave your soul out there for anyone to stomp on...

(Am I beginning to sound melodramatic now? Maybe I should just go back to bed...*s*)

Nicolina.
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by Nicolina »

Offline x-fuse

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« Reply #42 on: Tue, Jun 06, 2006, 11:19 PM »
Thank you 33andHolding. I appreciate what you said.

Quote
I just think that if you're going to do that, it should be something agreed on by both parties.


That is the problem, many people say they want harder feedback but the moment they get it, they and/or their friends attack. Some people don’t but almost all do.

I want say that I don’t just go around and picking fics apart. I don’t go after people I don’t like or even fics that I think are so horrible I just want to yell at them for mangling characters that I love just so they could write themselves in some fantasy. But I don’t do that. It is only people to have said that they are trying to improve and would like any help or ‘harder’ feedback. And if what I have said causing someone to have a fit, I don’t keep on continuing with the next chapter and the next. I stop. I don’t waste my time for people who say they want help but clearly only want to know how good they are.

Now as someone who’s writing has ‘attacked’ I respond in two ways. If it’s someone who is clearly after me not my writing I tend to not hold anything back. If it is someone who had read my fic and then disagreed with what I wrote or has given feedback that is ‘harder’ than I look at what they wrote. I either agree with it and see their pov either by taking their suggestions or admitting that they were right or I respond to them by saying I disagree with their opinions and sometimes why. I have no problem with them responding back to try and change my mind as long as we don’t get in a your wrong/I’m right argument. I like arguments with facts. (This is why I haven’t put anything new out in a long time, my beta, who got too busy for me, used to do this for my fics. Sometimes she would send my fics back to me with more green in them than black.)


Now I have been told many time in rl and in Vinland fic world that I can be brutally honest. I know I can. That tends to get me in trouble wherever I go. Will I change? No because I remember what it was like when I didn’t speak.

With that said, I do leave good feedback for people. I tell people I like their fics. I gush over some others. I have even begged for more. People know or I would hope they know that if I tell you I really liked something then I mean it. I don’t give out much feedback anymore because there is very little that I like. I mean I can go and open up five fics and respond to them but I don’t think the writer is going to like what I say because I won’t pretend to like something I don’t.
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by x-fuse »

"It's always fun to torment people...under the guise of being creative." - James Morrison

Offline Rachel

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« Reply #43 on: Tue, Jun 06, 2006, 11:51 PM »
I think we all basically agree that we only tend to giver tougher feedback if the writer specifically requests it.

We can go round in circles forever over this subject. Some people like tough feedback and some don't.

I'm sorry if I sound really harsh - I have PMS and I am not afraid to use it!   :giggle
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by Rachel »

Offline 33andHolding

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« Reply #44 on: Wed, Jun 07, 2006, 08:18 AM »
Eg, I agree.

Nic, I agree.

X, your welcome. It was long overdue.

Rachel, I agree.

Around and around we go, where this stops nobody knows.
 
There is nothing else to say on the subject. It will soon go from a discussion to an arguement. The topic is subjective, as are the posts in this thread.

Perhaps we should start a thread to discuss which came first, the chicken or the egg.

Hell, it's 10am and I still need more coffee.

Off I go...
Jenn
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by 33andHolding »

Offline Rachel

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« Reply #45 on: Wed, Jun 07, 2006, 08:23 AM »
:above  :)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by Rachel »

Offline x-fuse

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« Reply #46 on: Wed, Aug 23, 2006, 10:03 PM »
Quote
If you can't say anything nice... come sit over here by me.
Critical feedback, and you!

by Tara LJC O'Shea

Once upon a time, writers understood the difference between constructive criticism and a flame. When critical feedback was given, good writers used it to try and improve their work. Bad writers ignored it, as was their prerogative. But there was no crime in daring to say that something in a story was not working.

Today, if you give critical (i.e. negative) feedback on a piece of fan fiction, no matter what the forum, or the fandom, there is likely to be at least one person who will inform you that "if you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all," in order to spare the crushed feelings of the writer. More often than not, it is in fact the writer herself who makes the request.

Gather 'round, children, LJC has a life lesson for you: All fiction is judged by the same standard, regardless of the motives or intentions of the writer.

There are not separate rules for writers who write because it is a fun social activity, as opposed to writers who are interested in improving their work and their craft. Nor should there be. By limiting your feedback to spare the feelings of the one group, you are in fact condemning the other, not to mention condemning the audience to be forever bereft of better fiction.

The cardinal rule of writing is that the quality of the work should come before the writer's ego. Always. Period. There are no exceptions. If you write for fun, that's fine. But if you intend to share your work by publishing it—whether that means posting it to a mailing list, a newsgroup, a web site or your home page—you are opening up your work to constructive criticism. What you do with that criticism is up to you: you can use it to improve your work, or you can ignore it completely. It's up to you.

However, no one should have the right to insist that all feedback be positive. The mere idea is ludicrous, yet in these increasingly "politically correct" times, this attitude has become widespread online, to the detriment of all writers and fiction. By insisting that "negative" feedback be sent privately or not at all, you are robbing the author as well as every member of that forum of the chance to learn, grow, and become better writers. As a writer myself, and editor, and reader, I abhor the notion that the fragile egos of lowest common denominator must be catered to, at the expense of the rest of us.

A writer's goal is to tell the best story they are capable of telling. Anyone who writes merely for the gratification of receiving positive feedback to stroke their egos is not a writer. Is that an elitist attitude? Yes, and I make no apologies for it. This column has always and will always assume that someone calling themselves a writer is in fact willing to put in the hard work that goes with the title, and able to at least try to suffer the slings and arrows of constructive feedback without crumbling like a paper doll at the first sign of criticism.

Okay, down to the nitty-gritty of it. First of all, let's explain the difference between a flame, and critical feedback.

A flame attacks the author or the work in a way that is derogatory, inflammatory, and insulting.

However, if someone tells you that something in your story is not working, they have not "flamed" you. If they advise you to work on either the mechanics of writing, or your plotting skills, have issues with the dialogue or structure, they have not flamed you. If they believe that the characters are not acting in a manner consistent with the series you are writing about, they have not flamed you. In short, just because they said something "bad" about your story, that does not mean they are making an attack upon your person. Learn to separate your ego from the story. It's difficult; no one ever said it wasn't. Our stories are like our children, and we want to send them out into the world and learn that they were cherished, rather than reviled. But if your kid eats paste, dude... your kid eats paste. Not telling you so doesn't change the fact.

Of course, one's taste in fiction is subjective. Everyone has different personal tastes, and if yours do not coincide with the reader's, that does not necessarily mean that you are right and she is wrong, or vice versa. Authors should use constructive criticism to examine their work from a new perspective, and gauge for themselves if the feedback has merit and the work should be changed. It boils down to whether or not you think changing the story would make it a better story. However, while some things are subjective, others are not. Spelling is not. Grammar—with very few exceptions—is not. Canon is not. Learn how to distinguish objective feedback from subjective.

And for all you folks giving feedback, you're not off the hook here either!

All feedback should include a "why." Simply telling someone that her or his story needs work, without explaining why you believe that to be true defeats the purpose of giving feedback. Also, I am of the opinion that saying "This sucks," and nothing actually constructive makes you a whiny asshole. Saying "this sucks, and here's why, and here are some suggestions of how you can make it not suck," is proactive, and useful, and therefore justifies your existence.

Our goal in giving constructive feedback should always be to try and give the writer the data she needs to improve her work—if your goal is simply to insult the writer, cut her down, and blast apart the work itself with no regard for actually improving it, then you are using your role to simply satisfy your own ego. And what's more, it makes it harder for the rest of us.

Okay, so here's a distillation of what I'm trying to get across here:

Writers

  # If you write for entertainment, that's fine. But once you share that work, be prepared for critical feedback. If you can't handle it, then don't share in a public forum such as a newsgroup, website, message board, or mailing list.

  # Be able to distinguish critical feedback from a personal attack, or "flame."

  # Use critical feedback to objectively look at your work, and see if it can be improved. Do not reject it out of hand, simply because you didn't hear what you wanted to hear.

  # Armadillo hide is your friend. Try and grow a thicker skin, and don't take criticism of your work so personally.

Readers

  # All feedback should include a "why." Whether it's what is working, and why, or more importantly, what's not working, and why, it's the why that actually is useful.

  # Do not rip apart a writer's work just for the sake of being deliberately cruel. No one learns anything if they're so pissed off they reject your feedback out of hand, and if you're grandstanding just to puff up your own ego, you're wasting all our time.

  # Assume every writer is here to learn, and willing to listen. Better to give someone constructive feedback and have them ignore you, then not give feedback and have them never know they could have done something to improve the quality of their work.

  # Separate your thoughts about the work from your thoughts about the writer. If she's your best friend, or your worst enemy, you're not here to discuss the writer—you're here to discuss the writer's work on its own merits (or lack thereof).

Everyone

  # Banning critical feedback merely to coddle anyone's ego, or spare a writer's feelings, does more harm than good, and undermines the entire fan fiction community.

  # If a writer has the courage to share her work in a public forum (and websites—unless they are password protected—are public!), then she can use that same courage to receive critical feedback without falling apart, and in fact use it to improve her work. That strength springs from the same well, and we should be helping people reach for it, instead of keeping them forever in the dark where they will never learn and improve.

An excellent resource for both writers and readers is The Mannerly Art of Critique by author Peg Robinson. In the three years since its publication, it has become a part of the "Frequently Asked Questions" for the alt.startrek.creative newsgroup, and Peg herself encourages its distribution across the internet, in the hopes that it will help teach readers how to give feedback, and writers how to use that feedback to improve their work.



http://ljconstantine.com/column9.htm

That is a link to an interesting article I found on fan fics.

Edit because I didn't realize the article quote didn't go in.
« Last Edit: Thu, Aug 31, 2006, 09:59 AM by x-fuse »

"It's always fun to torment people...under the guise of being creative." - James Morrison

Offline magicflute

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« Reply #47 on: Wed, Aug 30, 2006, 05:44 AM »
Here a really late answer to a really old thread :confused ). One of the reasons I love this board (and AOVD) is that there are many well written non-Mary-Sue stories around here and really good writers.

All this to say, thank you all for all the helpful input you left in this thread and especially to turncopper who found and put up that great article on critiquing.

I am still learning how to LEAVE good feedback and this thread just gave me a couple ideas...


**************************************************
Edit today: Okay, I have to do my mea-culpa. Lately I AM writing smut, lots of it, for the sheer fun of it. Never expected it to be that much fun actually. So now, I'm writing action, comedy, sci-fi AND smut. :lolol  :lolol
« Last Edit: Tue, Apr 03, 2007, 04:00 AM by magicflute »

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Offline x-fuse

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« Reply #48 on: Thu, Aug 31, 2006, 09:58 AM »
I was reading some old fics by the same writer a few days ago and I could tell the order they were written because I could see the improvement. I don't know if I could do the same now days.

Quote
Personally I really prefer a tough critic who tells me where I went wrong and how to improve it (with examples. Public or not, I don't care as long as I feel this person wants to help me.


Me too but it is rare these days.  It also might help if I actually post something new.

I like the article that I posted above because I think she hit a few truths that need to be said.
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by x-fuse »

"It's always fun to torment people...under the guise of being creative." - James Morrison

Offline magicflute

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« Reply #49 on: Thu, Aug 31, 2006, 11:38 AM »
Just checked on the article, this is GREAT STUFF!  I love the one about the fringe element (research!!!) and the one that goes "If you can't say anything nice... come sit over here by me."

Thank you so much x-fuse!!!
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by magicflute »

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Offline x-fuse

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« Reply #50 on: Thu, Aug 31, 2006, 07:03 PM »
I think I going to print out the article to have by me when I write and also when I read. I hope I can follow some of her advice especially using why in feedback.
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by x-fuse »

"It's always fun to torment people...under the guise of being creative." - James Morrison

Offline magicflute

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DOING MY MEA CULPA
« Reply #51 on: Tue, Apr 03, 2007, 04:02 AM »
Quote from: "magicflute"
Here a really late answer to a really old thread :confused ). One of the reasons I love this board (and AOVD) is that there are many well written non-Mary-Sue stories around here and really good writers.

All this to say, thank you all for all the helpful input you left in this thread and especially to turncopper who found and put up that great article on critiquing.

I am still learning how to LEAVE good feedback and this thread just gave me a couple ideas...



I have to add something to this today: Okay, I have to do my mea-culpa. Lately I AM writing smut, lots of it, for the sheer fun of it. Never expected it to be that much fun actually. So now, I'm writing action, comedy, sci-fi AND smut. :lolol  :lolol
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by magicflute »

My other house is a Porsche

Offline Rachel

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« Reply #52 on: Tue, Apr 03, 2007, 04:06 AM »
Smut is fun - it's my lighthearted relief for my stressful life - just to explain my reason's for reading and writing smut :)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by Rachel »

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« Reply #53 on: Tue, Apr 03, 2007, 05:26 AM »
Oh and you write it so well hahahaha love your writing ;)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by magicflute »

My other house is a Porsche

Offline evilgrin

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« Reply #54 on: Tue, Apr 03, 2007, 07:11 AM »
nothing at all wrong with writing smut, and, done well, it can be a vital element in character development
and then there's just plain old yummy smut, written purely for the satisfaction value
love it either way :)
Elaine:)
« Last Edit: Wed, Dec 31, 1969, 04:00 PM by evilgrin »

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