Author Topic: The Art of the Sex Scene  (Read 3916 times)

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Offline NorthernLights

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The Art of the Sex Scene
« on: Sun, Sep 07, 2008, 05:28 PM »
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The Art of the Sex Scene  
by Catherine Knepper

Perhaps the most important thing I can tell you about good sex scenes is that they should first and foremost be good scenes. All the elements I look for in a great scene—vivid writing grounded in the concrete and specific; gripping, convincing action and dialogue; the revelation of character; a ratcheting up of tension—apply no less to sex scenes. Likewise, sex scenes are just as vulnerable to the common pitfalls of any troubled scene: abstraction or vagueness, a lack of tension, a lack of momentum (i.e., a scene that does not develop character or advance plot), or stilted dialogue—just to name a few.

Yet the sex scene is a very special kind of scene—one that provides a unique opportunity to see characters at their most vulnerable—and they’re notoriously difficult to write. My work as a teacher, an editor, and a writer has afforded me the opportunity to read a great many sex scenes, each at different stages of completion. Here, I’ll tell you about what undermines the scenes I regularly encounter in, shall we say, “unrevised” fiction so you’ll know what to avoid, and I’ll outline some principles on how to transform a faltering sex scene into artful writing.

Determine if you really need a sex scene. First, make sure your sex scene is integral to the story. It shouldn’t be there merely to spice up a lagging narrative, or as a blatant attempt to titillate. Like all good scenes, sex scenes should be doing double or even triple duty. That is, a great scene is always about the present action—in this case, sex—and about something else. A student of mine once tried to portray the dissolution of a marriage. She knew she had bitten off an enormous topic, but she was smart enough to know that she had to focus on just a day or two from the couple’s life, and to show the dissolution through scenes rather than tell us about it in summary. The story was ably written, but everyone agreed that it just wasn’t doing much, that something vital was lacking. Over her next three drafts, the student was able to craft a brief, heartbreaking sex scene. The couple’s actions were rote and mechanical, done out of duty rather than desire, and their dialogue was believable but perfunctory. That did it. The scene was no more than half a page long, but it crystallized the inner workings of a crumbling relationship. By the end of the story, the author did not have to write a melodramatic parting scene. There was no need. Her artful sex scene had shown everything we needed to know.

Be concrete; be specific. Put negatively: don’t write in abstract or vague language. The novice writer loves and finds refuge in abstraction. It is far easier to simply tell or summarize rather than describe, or better stated, re-create events. This is what good writing does: it re-creates reality. With the very best books, we are so absorbed in the narrative world that we nearly forget we are reading—the writing is that good, the fictional events seem that real. One of the problems with abstract language is that it puts a significant barrier between the reader and the narrative. We are kept at a distance with language such as “I was cast into oblivion” or “Their bodies were awash in ecstasy.” Far better is to show us that ecstasy. Don’t be afraid to draw the camera’s focus in to a close-up: show us, in language that appeals to the senses, what’s happening between your characters. And this is as good a place as any to tell you that yes, by all means, if you write an erotic sex scene, you should be turned on by it. If you’re not, don’t expect us to be.

Don’t skip the foreplay. Let me quickly follow all this talk of concrete and specific detail by saying that your sex scenes need not be lascivious. Remember that your main point is a literary one—the scene is an intimate moment of character and plot development—and that the emotional drama is far more important than any physical act. Readers hunger for concrete, specific information that engages their senses, but this doesn’t mean you must provide a detailed, organ-by-organ account of your characters’ sexual activities. More often than not, this actually works against you: I’ve seen plenty of sex scenes that read like a boring anatomy lesson. Lastly, remember that one of the sexiest things about good sex scenes is anticipation. Sometimes, it’s better to provide just enough detail to whet readers’ appetites and then let their imaginations take over.

Watch your language. I’m not referring to abstaining from four-letter words…not necessarily. But what your mother told you is true: there’s a time and place for everything. One ill-chosen word or an inappropriate line of dialogue can quickly undermine a sex scene. Unless you’re going for humor, lewd language that comes out of left field probably doesn’t belong in a tender, romantic sex scene, and the opposite is of course true: I’ve seen raw, brutal sex scenes ruined by a moment of sentimental shmaltz. Always use language that’s appropriate to your characters, time period, and fictional milieu. (And really, it’s best to avoid sentimentality in any occasion.)

The more common mistakes I see involve clichéd language. Some of the terms writers use—usually for body parts or various sexual acts—are so overused that they’ve become downright comical. I don’t know about you, but I and most every other editor I know can’t read “turgid member” or “heaving/shuddering breast” or see nipples compared to cherries without snickering or at least rolling our eyes. Out of deference for your delicate sensibilities, I’ll refrain from quoting more explicit examples, but I’m sure you can imagine them. Always, always, say it in a new way.

Harder to resist, and not so immediately off-putting, is what I refer to as “breathless” language. Even if you’re writing for Harlequin, you should avoid language like “We became one thing/one body/one soul” or “I was carried to the depths of ecstasy/oblivion” (or its close variant, “I was carried out of my body” or “…to a place where meaning and sense were no more”) or the ever-popular “She lost herself in him.” There are several problems with this type of abstract, tired language, but perhaps the biggest one is that it’s so vague that it could belong to anybody. Language like this floats above the fray, and could easily be excised from the text and set into another book. Instead, give us a sex scene that can only be about your specific characters. No one sex scene will look or sound exactly like another. Cookie-cutter sex simply doesn’t represent reality.

Inhibition, inhibitions. Many writers are simply uncomfortable writing about sex. What should you do if you’re one of them? Well, once you’ve determined that a sex scene is necessary, go to your writing room and lock the door. If you write in public, make sure you get a corner table. Wherever you are, you don’t want your parents/kids/partner/random stranger interrupting you, or God forbid, peering over your shoulder. No one is allowed to see your first draft except you, and if you’re like me, even the thought of someone spying on your rough drafts is enough to make you reach for a beta blocker. Next, if at all possible, try and remove yourself from whatever the source of anxiety or inhibition is. (Mine looked like an alarming amalgam of my grandfather and my childhood Southern Baptist minister.) Banish that specter to the nether darkness where it belongs. It may help to think of yourself in purely mechanical terms: you are a craftsperson, and your job is to build a scene. A crucial, character-revealing scene that portrays a moment of intimacy and emotion and vulnerability. Now write and write and write again. If it’s awful, don’t worry—not yet. No one is going to see it, and if it’s really terrible, you can delete it.

And hey, if the magic just isn’t happening now, go easy on yourself. Sure, you should try and stretch your horizons, but the last thing you want is a forced, obviously laborious sex scene. If you try and try and it just isn’t working, there are other options. Perhaps your lovers can have an intense, intimate conversation, or engage in a passionate, flirtatious debate. And here is where the lesson on “foreplay” can be particularly useful. There is much to be said for a scene that paints a vivid portrait of desire and anticipation and then makes a graceful exit, leaving the details to readers’ imaginations. Some of the most memorable sex scenes in literature do so: the (in)famous hotel sex scene in Lolita (that’s Chapter 29, for those of you who want a refresher), or the moment in Ian McEwan’s The Comfort of Strangers when Mary and Colin kiss and embrace, then return to their bedroom to undress “in semidarkness,” or this oft-quoted passage from Madame Bovary: “[Emma] tilted back her white neck, her throat swelled with a sigh, and, swooning, weeping, with a long shudder, hiding her face, she surrendered.”

Look to the greats for inspiration. Early in this article, I described myself as a teacher, editor, and writer. But I will always be first and foremost a reader. Literature boasts an astonishing variety of sex scenes, and you’re sure to find inspiration somewhere along the continuum. Read the novels I mentioned above. Read the Victorians, who give us a glimpse of lovers glancing knowingly at one another and then cut away to white space (or that oh-so-telling set of asterisks). Try out the raunchy hilarity of Portnoy’s Complaint. Read the heart-wrenching sex scenes from The Corrections, the lush, Gothic sex scenes of A.N. Roquelaure (a.k.a. Anne Rice), Erica Jong’s classic Fear of Flying, the bizarre and funny sex from Jonathan Ames or Steve Almond, and Alan Hollinghurst’s masterfully written The Line of Beauty. Try out a couple of tawdry bodice-rippers just for comparison’s sake.

Then get writing. Show us something new. Maybe the scene will give us a flash of insight into a character or a situation that we couldn’t have received otherwise, or maybe this is the moment when something unexpected will be revealed, or maybe we’ll finally learn the motivation driving a particular character. Whatever happens, remember that a sex scene is never just about body parts and physical sensations. However steamy or restrained, your sex scene should reflect the full lives of your characters—their needs and desires, their unique life histories and personal experiences, their attitudes, their thoughts, their emotions, and of course, the relationship between them. More often than not, a great sex scene is based not upon what occurs between bodies, but what occurs between minds, hearts, and souls.  


And since she mentioned him...

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Writing Sex  
In which the author offers 10 guiding principles to the would-be pornographers among you
BY STEVE ALMOND

Every single time I go to a party, or, at least, like, once every 50 parties, someone will approach and say, "Hey Steve, you sure do write about sex a lot. Any advice?"

I usually tell him or her that I don’t write about sex, that I write about desire and heartbreak and that I can’t believe someone as intelligent-seeming as he or she would reduce my art to lurid gymnastics. Then I ask for money.

This is rarely effective.

So I’m just going to go whole hog and — in honor of the spring that should be arriving any month now — set down my 10 Rules For Writing Real Classy Sex Scenes.

1) Stop having sex.

This is very important. Remember that the sexiest thing about sex is really desire, which is just a fancy word for not getting laid.

2) Never compare a woman’s nipples to:

a) Cherries.

b) Cherry pits.

c) Pencil erasers.

d) Frankenstein’s bolts.

Nipples are tricky. They come in all sorts of shapes and sizes and shades. They do not, as a rule, look like much of anything, aside from nipples. So resist making dumb-shit comparisons.

3) Never, ever use the words "penis" or "vagina."

There is no surer way to kill the erotic buzz than to use these terms, which call to mind — to my mind, at least — health class (in the best instance) and (in the worst instance) venereal disease.

As a rule, in fact, there is often no reason at all to name the genitals. Consider the following sentence:

"She poured sesame oil onto her palm and reached for my penis."

Now consider this alternative:

"She poured sesame oil onto her palm and reached for me."

Is there any real doubt as to where this particular horndoggle is reaching?

I rest my wok.

3(a) Resist the temptation to use genital euphemisms (unless you are trying to be funny).

No: tunnel of love, candy shop, secret garden, pleasure gate, bearded clam.

Equally no: mule, flesh kabob, magic wand, shaft of manhood.

I could go on, but only for my own amusement.

4) Then again, sometimes sex is funny.

And if you ever saw a videotape of yourself in action, I bet you’d agree. An absurd arrangement. So don’t be afraid to portray its comic aspects. If one of your characters, at the height of passion, screams her father’s name, note this. If another can’t stay hard, allow him to use a ponytail holder for an improvised cock ring. And later on, if his daughter comes home and demands to know where her ponytail holder is, well, so be it.

5) Don’t forget the foreplay.

It took me a few years to realize this (okay, 20) but the lead-in is often better than the actual humping part. So don’t make the traditional XXX mistake. Don’t cut from a flirtatious discussion to a gag-defying fellatio. Tease the reader a little. Let the drama of the seduction prime us for the action.

5a) It takes a long time to make a woman come.

I speak here from experience. So please, don’t try to sell us on the notion that a man can enter a woman, elicit a shuddering moan or two, and bring her off. No sale. In fact, I’d steer clear of announcing orgasms at all. Rarely, in my experience, do men or women announce their orgasms. They simply have them. Their bodies are taken by sensation and tossed about in various ways. Best to describe the tossing.

6) Fluid is fun.

Look, sex is sticky. There’s no way around this. If you want to represent the truth of the acts, you will likely be required to pay homage to the resultant wetnesses. And I’m not just talking about semen or vaginal fluid. I’m also talking sweat and saliva, which I consider to be the perfume of lovers, as well as whatever one chooses as a lubricant (sesame oil?).

7) Real people do not talk in porn clichés.

They do not say: "Give it to me, big boy."

They do not say: "Suck it, baby. That’s right, all the way down."

They do not say: "Yes, deeper, harder, deeper! Oh, baby, oh, Christ, yes!"

At least, they do not say these things to me.

Most of the time, real people say all kinds of weird, funny things during sex, such as, "I think I’m losing circulation" and "I’ve got a cramp in my foot" and "Oh, sorry!" and "Did you come already? Goddamn it!"

8) Don’t obsess over the rude parts.

Sex is inherently over the top. Just telling the reader that two (or more) people are getting down will automatically direct us toward the genitals. It is your job, as an author, to direct us elsewhere, to the more inimitable secrets of the naked body. Give us the indentations on the small of a woman’s back, or the minute trembling of a man’s hands. And remember that sometimes the secrets of the human body are funny-looking. Again, I am speaking from experience.

9) Use all the senses.

The cool thing about sex — aside from its being, uh, sex — is that it engages all five of our human senses. So don’t ignore the more subtle cues. Give us the scents and the tastes and the sounds of the act. And stay away from the obvious ones. By which I mean that I’d take a sweet, embarrassed pussyfart over a shuddering moan any day.

You can quote me on that.

10) It is okay to get aroused by your own sex scenes.

In fact, it’s pretty much required. Remember, part of the intent of a good sex scene is to arouse the reader. And you’re not likely to do that unless you, yourself, are feeling the same delicious tremors. You should be envisioning what you’re writing and — whether with one hand or two — transcribing these visions in detail.

This is a list of basics, but there is one other incredibly important rule, which, if followed scrupulously, will not only land you on the bestseller list, but will dramatically improve your sex life and give you orgasms of an intensity and duration you never imagined possible.

You’ll have to pay for that one.

You want it? Steve Almond can be reached at sbalmond@earthlink.net  


Offline evilgrin

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #1 on: Sun, Sep 07, 2008, 05:54 PM »
Quote from: "NorthernLights"
first and foremost be good scenes.
provides a unique opportunity to see characters at their most vulnerable
The scene was no more than half a page long, but it crystallized the inner workings of a crumbling relationship. By the end of the story, the author did not have to write a melodramatic parting scene. There was no need. Her artful sex scene had shown everything we needed to know.
And this is as good a place as any to tell you that yes, by all means, if you write an erotic sex scene, you should be turned on by it. If you’re not, don’t expect us to be.
Don’t skip the foreplay.
I’ve seen plenty of sex scenes that read like a boring anatomy lesson.
one of the sexiest things about good sex scenes is anticipation.
clichéd language.

I usually tell him or her that I don’t write about sex, that I write about desire and heartbreak and that I can’t believe someone as intelligent-seeming as he or she would reduce my art to lurid gymnastics. Then I ask for money.
the sexiest thing about sex is really desire, which is just a fancy word for not getting laid.
5) Don’t forget the foreplay.
5a) It takes a long time to make a woman come.
don’t try to sell us on the notion that a man can enter a woman, elicit a shuddering moan or two, and bring her off.
7) Real people do not talk in porn clichés.
Most of the time, real people say all kinds of weird, funny things during sex, such as, "I think I’m losing circulation" and "I’ve got a cramp in my foot" and "Oh, sorry!" and "Did you come already? Goddamn it!"


had to quote because I think I love these people!

I love to write sex scenes (obviously -- Virtual Pleasures, right?)
But one of the things I love about writing them is that they're not just some weird how-to tab a into slot b manual on sex but they're sexy and fun, they have a reality in them. Sure, not all of them have toecramps and spurting fluid and odd declarations (although some of them do) but they're all these sexy little scenes that would be sexy little scenes even if no actual sex took place. It's not the specific act that turns us on as the way it makes us feel.

As social animals, we have all these different ways of communicating, and 90% of that is non-verbal. I think sex kicks that up a notch, when almost all of it is non-verbal. We get this whole other look into a character, and I completely understand the writer when she states it's a chance to explore a character when they're vulnerable, when there's no act. That's neat!

gotta agree on the rest of the points too, about what not to call things, and- for me anyway- the sex talk. I think if my hubbs ever came at me with some of those cornball lines I'd burst out laughing.

really neat find, NL!
Elaine:)

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Offline silver

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #2 on: Sun, Sep 07, 2008, 09:54 PM »
Steve Almond--
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Best to describe the tossing.

I love this guy already!

Okay, now I have my list; I'm off to the library!

Great links, thanks, must study...(delete delete delete...don't watch me; it all needed to go!)
 :hit2


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Offline njrd

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #3 on: Mon, Sep 08, 2008, 02:37 AM »
I find really interesting that most of the writers mentioned are men. Not that I know any of them  :kiss  :)


Offline Montgomery Burns 13

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #4 on: Mon, Sep 08, 2008, 11:42 AM »
Cool articles.  Both informative and helpful, especially those ten principles by Steve Almond.  Thanks for posting, NorthernLights!
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Offline evilgrin

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #5 on: Mon, Sep 08, 2008, 11:52 AM »
:hhah yeah, and they're still funny and all the more true on the re-read
it's good stuff
Elaine:)

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Offline TheMorningStar

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #6 on: Mon, Sep 08, 2008, 05:43 PM »
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Yet the sex scene is a very special kind of scene—one that provides a unique opportunity to see characters at their most vulnerable—and they’re notoriously difficult to write.


I dunno, maybe I'm a weirdo or a sex maniac or something( :hhah )

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There is much to be said for a scene that paints a vivid portrait of desire and anticipation and then makes a graceful exit, leaving the details to readers’ imaginations. Some of the most memorable sex scenes in literature do so: the (in)famous hotel sex scene in Lolita (that’s Chapter 29, for those of you who want a refresher), or the moment in Ian McEwan’s The Comfort of Strangers when Mary and Colin kiss and embrace, then return to their bedroom to undress “in semidarkness,” or this oft-quoted passage from Madame Bovary: “[Emma] tilted back her white neck, her throat swelled with a sigh, and, swooning, weeping, with a long shudder, hiding her face, she surrendered.”


Now I DO agree with this part...but also have to fully admit that I HATE IT when writer's do this. By all means end the current scene like this, flash to a future scene, but for Pete's sake TELL ME WHAT HAPPENED!!*giggle*.

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the lush, Gothic sex scenes of A.N. Roquelaure (a.k.a. Anne Rice

)

MMMmmmm SO GOOOD!!!


This Steve Almond guy is HILARIOUS! I have to find some of his books now!!

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1) Stop having sex.


As awful as this is it's very true, some of my best smut writing comes from times of abstinence(and NEVER by choice!!)

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5a) It takes a long time to make a woman come.


YES this is true...BUT...

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don’t try to sell us on the notion that a man can enter a woman, elicit a shuddering moan or two, and bring her off.

 

...I have also had this happen!*pointing to the above quote*

Quote
Real people do not talk in porn clichés.

They do not say: "Give it to me, big boy."

They do not say: "Suck it, baby. That’s right, all the way down."

They do not say: "Yes, deeper, harder, deeper! Oh, baby, oh, Christ, yes!"


I've had people say things like this to me(and under the right amount of alcohol have SAID similar things!*blush*) and it all depends on WHAT exactly they say, HOW they say it, and under what circumstances it is said that makes it STUPID or painfully arousing! Heehee!

Those were awesome articles! Thanks!!!


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Offline jaimejo2929

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #7 on: Mon, Sep 08, 2008, 06:55 PM »
Wonderful words of wisedom to write by.
And I must agree that Anne Rice can write a smoking sex scene.
Hell some of the non sex scene she's written got me all hot and bothered.
Great find.
Thanks for sharing.

Offline Mitheria

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #8 on: Wed, Sep 10, 2008, 06:18 PM »
Great advice!  Both of those articles had some really good guidelines.  

I'm still on the 'writing for yourself' part of it.  But if I ever get brave enough to post anything, I'll definitely be coming back to this article to check myself ;)


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Offline evilgrin

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #9 on: Wed, Sep 10, 2008, 06:29 PM »
you're a writer! Well...*Evil throws an arm over Mitheria's shoulder, whispering conspiratorially*
you definitely picked the right place, so don't be afraid to post your stories here
Elaine:)

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Offline Mitheria

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #10 on: Wed, Sep 10, 2008, 07:32 PM »
Hehe I'm a closet writer for the moment.  But being around here will most likely help me break out of that eventually.  Although, all of you are so talented that it makes me a little nervous.  Seriously, you all have some mad skillz :D


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Offline NorthernLights

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #11 on: Wed, Sep 10, 2008, 08:04 PM »
Don't be nervous about posting.  We have some amazingly talented people here and you'll find that the members are very supportive and are always willing provide constructive criticisms and guidance to anyone who wants it.   :)

Offline Mitheria

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #12 on: Wed, Sep 10, 2008, 08:36 PM »
Quote from: "NorthernLights"
Don't be nervous about posting.  We have some amazingly talented people here and you'll find that the members are very supportive and are always willing provide constructive criticisms and guidance to anyone who wants it.   :)


Yeah, you all seem like very personable people (does that even make sense? :P) and I'm really enjoying it here. I think it'll be here that I break out of my shell.  I actually enjoy constructive criticism and am always looking to improve.  I'll most likely get brave here in a while but for now I'm enjoying seeing what all of you write.

*blushes* sorry for derailing the thread for a little while there :P


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Offline Cyren

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #13 on: Wed, Sep 10, 2008, 09:17 PM »
OMG! She blushes!!!

I remember when i did that on here...long, long ago...lol.

Another writer! Awesome! And hunny i was in your shoes not that long ago and let me tell you that there couldn't be a more supportive bunch of people as far as writing is concerned. Any help you need just holler...

:think maybe we need a virgin writer's thread...or do we already have one?


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Offline Bitten

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #14 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 08:21 AM »
There are so many opportunities to write different types of things here. The Picture This forum is a great place to start. Don't be shy!  :)

Offline evilgrin

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #15 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 08:35 AM »
I started up a new writers thread here: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=10837

Writing in the closet...well, see there's a problem right there :kiss
Elaine:)

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Offline Bitten

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #16 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 08:48 AM »
We don't bite, but the spiders in the closet might bite, so it's definitely safer to come out here with us. :D

Offline NorthernLights

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #17 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 04:18 PM »
Quote from: "Bitten"
We don't bite :devil2


Offline Mitheria

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #18 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 07:40 PM »
Quote from: "Bitten"
There are so many opportunities to write different types of things here. The Picture This forum is a great place to start. Don't be shy!  ;)

Quote from: "evilgrin"
I started up a new writers thread here: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=10837

Writing in the closet...well, see there's a problem right there :kiss
Elaine:)


I saw that thread, it's a great idea.  It helps to know that everyone was once as chicken as me :P

LOL  ... closets can be fun.  But you're right and honestly I don't think I've ever seen so many women in one place that actually get along and are so nice... and helpful... and welcoming :D  I think I *will* start with the 'Picture This' thread.  I've got some time tomorrow night, so I'll probably start going through it and seeing what there is and maybe actually getting started on something.   Gah... hopefully it won't suck.



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Offline evilgrin

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #19 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 07:42 PM »
:kiss yer not going to suck!
Elaine:)

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Offline NorthernLights

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #20 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 07:48 PM »
Quote from: "evilgrin"
:kiss yer not going to suck!
Elaine:)


gah!!!
why does she keep feeding me these one liners.......


I promise to be good

Offline NorthernLights

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #21 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 07:49 PM »
You'll do fine.
Looking forward to your stories.

 :hugs

Offline Mitheria

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #22 on: Thu, Sep 11, 2008, 07:58 PM »
Quote from: "NorthernLights"
Quote from: "evilgrin"
:kiss yer not going to suck!
Elaine:)


gah!!!
why does she keep feeding me these one liners.......


It's bait!  You're being tested  :laughter


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Offline NorthernLights

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #23 on: Fri, Sep 12, 2008, 04:42 PM »
:lolol

Offline silver

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #24 on: Fri, Sep 12, 2008, 10:13 PM »
Mitheria-
Picture This is a great way to just throw something out there...unless you have Poetry?
Or a Vin-character fic just hanging around gathering dust?

You can yell for a beta to 'check', or just to preview, or post something in a google-doc.  That's a great way to get tons of assistance at once.  The whole "brand-new-writer" thing will vanish rather quickly.
 :hit2


...insatiable...

Offline Mitheria

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #25 on: Sat, Sep 13, 2008, 02:26 PM »
Unfortunately, I don't have anything left but you've all inspired me to go ahead and start again.  I'm writing one now - though forgive me if it's a little slow in coming because it's been a while.  Takes a bit to get back in the groove.

Thanks for the links and the encouragement and I'm pretty sure I'll be begging someone to beta for me before long :P


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Offline magicflute

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #26 on: Thu, May 07, 2009, 08:16 AM »
Somehow I think all this could be summed up with

- if you've never got off on sex abstain from writing about it, a sex scene is NOT compulsory for a good story.

and

If you do write about one, do it 150% (:lolmao ) and don't try hard to make everybody involved look good, clean, pretty, smelling of perfume or soap and not leaving any scrapemarks from 3-day beards or scratchmarks from overlong (or broken) fingernails.

It just never happens that-a-way...  :evillol

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Offline jrb871

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Re: The Art of the Sex Scene
« Reply #27 on: Sat, May 09, 2009, 07:55 PM »
Anne Rice has some crazy stuff out there - the BDSM/fetish themed 'Beauty' series, I'm thinking - but now she's a born again Christian and only writes religious fiction. According to her website, her earlier sex and vampire stuff is all 'a metaphor' for various things...riiight.  :lolmao