Author Topic: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 12/?  (Read 1208 times)

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Offline Bitten

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 10/?
« Reply #60 on: Thu, Apr 25, 2013, 05:24 AM »
Thanks, Cyren. :)

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 11/?
« Reply #61 on: Wed, May 08, 2013, 06:12 AM »
Chapter 11

Thanks to Monty and ban sidhe for the beta!


Kirk arrived early, checking in with the bridge, reviewing his schedule. Killing time. The Enterprise was scheduled to leave space dock mid-morning. Even though the departure would be relatively uneventful for the crew, they all looked forward to it.

The Enterprise commanded an appreciative audience whenever it put in an appearance. Most of the station personnel would be on-hand to watch the flagship drift away from the base and warp out of sight; even the most seasoned brass would probably find a port to watch as she left. The crew couldn't help but feel a burst of pride, knowing that the entire starbase would be watching.

Kirk loved knowing that so many people would be looking at his ship. Some spectators would be admiring her sleek lines, while others would be eager for that starburst when she went into warp. Others would simply be envious of her crew.

"Let's give them a good show," he murmured quietly to the ship, drawing his hand along her view port.

He and Sulu had already plotted their departure coordinates to give the starbase spectators an unobstructed view -- and to give the Enterprise’s crew another chance to feel the appreciation of their admirers. Kirk always made a point of giving new crew members a good vantage for their initial departure; he felt it helped drive home a sense of pride at being assigned to the Federation’s famous flagship. He also simply enjoyed watching their reaction to the spectacle.

Wonder how Lea will react? he mused. Maybe she’ll find this more impressive than last night’s dinner.

Glancing at the chrono, he realized that it finally was time for her to arrive. He moved behind his work station and straightened a few items. He hardly ever used this office, preferring to handle most administrative duties on the bridge, but he thought this first official meeting with Lea deserved a little more privacy. He smiled in anticipation.

***

Lea took a deep breath, frowning in apprehension.

She’d had trouble sleeping the night before, partially because she was excited to finally be on board the Enterprise, but also because she dreaded the prospect of seeing Jim Kirk first thing in the morning.

Kirk, she thought, her frown deepening. Okay, I can do this. I survived yesterday. This won’t be so bad.

She wished she’d had a cup of coffee. Still unfamiliar with the ship’s layout, she hadn’t wanted to risk a detour to the cafeteria; being late for her first official duty shift would be embarrassingly unprofessional, especially for something as silly as getting lost on a coffee run.

So here I am, looking at Kirk’s office door, tired, hungover and uncaffeinated. She took another deep breath, wiped her damp palms on her skirt, and forced a smile.

***

“Good morning, Miss Archer,” Kirk said with a bright grin. “Are you ready to get started?”

Oh, he’s chipper, she thought. Of course, he knows where the coffee is.

Glancing around his sleek office, she felt cheered by his energetic manner, and she realized that she was indeed ready. “Yes, I think I am.”

He gestured for her to take a seat, and as she did, she noted that the high-tech office was pristine. She wondered if he was obsessively neat, or if he simply never used the room; it had that “brand new” feel to it. The viewport offered a spectacular view of another ship, docked in the spoke next to Enterprise. The stars were dim in comparison to the light of the starbase, and other ships moving in and out of the busy port created a captivating tapestry.

“You’ve got a nice vantage point here,” she said admiringly, as she settled into the chair.

Kirk glanced out the port, then replied, “Just wait until you see the view from the bridge.” His tone was teasing, with a note of promise and unbridled enthusiasm. He still wore that devilish smile, and now his eyes seemed to sparkle with amusement. Just as last night, she could practically feel his larger-than-life personality washing over her. That arrogance would be annoying, coming from most other people, but with Kirk, it seemed ... somewhat inviting. Her own excitement stirred fully awake.

“I can barely wait,” she replied.

“Yeah, me too,” he said.

Her forehead crinkled in puzzlement as she wondered what he meant, but then he continued speaking.

“Every day, I can barely wait to get to the bridge. There’s always something new, something amazing happening. This ship, this crew...I can’t imagine a better place to be.”

Lea smiled at his passion, and the sincerity in his voice. “You sound just like my uncle, whenever he talks about the Enterprise. And Admiral Pike, too.”

Kirk dropped his gaze for an instant, almost as if he were embarrassed at the comparison, but then he looked back at her with intense focus. “Well, give it a week or two, and I bet you will feel the same way.”

“Oh, I don’t doubt you,” she replied with a soft laugh.

“Wise choice,” he replied, grinning brashly.

She laughed again, genuinely enjoying the conversation. This isn’t so bad.

Then Kirk said, “Okay, down to business. I’d like for us to meet daily, before Alpha shift, just to discuss any difficulties or opportunities that might come up during the planned route.”

Lea nodded, then he continued, “I do a thorough review of the races that we might encounter, so I have an idea of what to expect, but I think your input will be helpful in our planning.”

Lea smiled, surprised that Kirk would consider her observations for planning. Her research usually was called upon only after a problem had arisen. Maybe Kirk’s proactive approach would allow her work to be more valuable. “Thank you, Captain,” she replied. “I assume you’ll want a written report, in addition to the verbal one?”

“Yes, after we discuss your ideas, I’d like you to disseminate a copy to the bridge crew,” Kirk replied. “Then you can update in real time from the bridge throughout the shift.”

“Sounds good,” she replied. “Will all my work be done on the bridge?”

“You can work wherever it’s most convenient for you,” he replied, “but I’ll expect you to be on the bridge for the first half of Alpha shift, and any new contact situations or conflicts. I’ve assigned Ensign Chekov to help you get set up with your work station.”

“Is the work station similar to the interface at Starbase 12?” she asked, hoping this new flagship would be better equipped.

“I think you’ll prefer this interface,” he replied, looking pleased with himself.

Or is he pleased with his ship? Lea wondered. Hard to tell where pride in the Enterprise stops and simple arrogance begins.

“I studied your logs from the starbase, and your recommendations for an upgrade in the system,” he continued. “We’ve configured your workstation to your specs.”

Lea’s eyebrows rose in surprise. “Wow. That’s great! I didn’t expect this.”

Kirk laughed, obviously pleased with her response. “What did you expect, Miss Archer?”

The intensity was back in his gaze, and she had the feeling that he was referring to more than her workstation. What had she expected? Challenge. Fulfillment. Excitement and opportunity. But what she hadn’t expected was for the very self-assured captain to have such blue eyes. Weeding through this chaos of thought, Lea chose the most prudent answer she could manage. “I expected the standard Starfleet interface.”

Kirk appeared to contemplate her words, and then, with a mock expression of seriousness, he said, “A word of advice.”

Lea’s brow rose questioningly. “Yes?”

“Raise your expectations, Miss Archer. You’re on the Enterprise now. We can accomplish anything.” And there was that expression again; an elusive combination of arrogance, amusement and intensity. Lea wondered if every conversation with him would be like this, and if she would always suspect some hidden meaning behind his words. Before she could respond, he stood.

“Now, are you ready to see the bridge?”

***

Lea spent the next few hours with Ensign Chekov, learning the intricacies of working on the bridge of a Constitution Class starship. The plethora of new technology on the Enterprise was both thrilling and overwhelming, and the constant chatter among the bridge crew was distracting.

Every process and function was fascinating, especially since it was so different from the routine on a starbase. She kept catching herself smiling, then schooling the expression to a more professional countenance; she didn’t want to appear too provincial among these Starfleet adepts.

She found Ensign Chekov to be just as talkative as he had been on the previous evening, though she had to ask him to repeat himself several times. His accent seemed to deepen along with his enthusiasm, and each new control and gadget seemed to excite him more than the last. The youthful exuberance was delightful, and she found herself more relaxed and at ease with him than anyone else she’d met so far.

“Did you do the work to reconfigure my interface?” she asked. His familiarity with the system was amazing; he seemed to know every nuance of the workstation’s capabilities.

“Yes, Mister Scott and I used your guidelines to redesign the interface and database extrapolations,” he replied, rolling his r’s thickly. “The only thing we changed from your specs is this communication option.”

He quickly keyed up the message function, showing her how to feed data directly to the captain’s attention. It was elegant and unobtrusive. “Was that Kirk’s idea?”

“Yes, he thought it would be more helpful this way,” Chekov replied.

Lea was mildly surprised that the captain had put so much thought into her work. He’d obviously been serious when he said he’d reviewed the logs from Starbase 12. The communication problems she’d had with Commander Derkson wouldn’t be an issue here. “Is he always this thorough?”

Chekov laughed. “He is when it comes to his command, and this ship. He wants us to keep the Enterprise at the leading edge, in everything, all the time,” he said. “Keeps me and Mister Scott very busy.” 

Lea thought about the chief engineer, and his odd behavior the night before. Still wondering why he seemed so frazzled by her presence, she said, “I’m sorry I didn’t have a chance to talk with Mister Scott more. He left so quickly last night.”

“Oh, that’s because he’s afraid of you,” Chekov said lightly.

“What? Why would he be afraid of me?” Lea asked.

Chekov had called up another checklist for her to review, then replied, “I think it’s because of that dog.”

Lea looked at him, befuddled, wondering if she had misunderstood his words again. “Dog?” she repeated.

“Yes, your uncle’s dog. The one Scotty lost in the transporter test.”

Then, finally, comprehension dawned on her. Her uncle had been extremely upset when the latest in his long line of beagles had been zapped away by “some careless lout.” She vaguely remembered that Uncle Jon had the man transferred to some deserted outpost. She breathed out a heavy sigh, then turned to the checklist. “I never realized the culprit was our chief engineer.”

Chekov’s eyes widened. “Maybe I should have kept my big mouth shut?” he said hesitantly.

Lea laughed. “I’m glad you told me. It’s good to know why he’s so uncomfortable around me.”

Suddenly, a hush fell over the bridge. Kirk had entered, striding toward the captain’s chair while talking with the helmsman. Lea thought his name was Sulu, the pilot who had handled the Enterprise with such valor during the conflict with Nero. The unbidden thought caused Lea’s breath to catch for a moment, but then she looked away, focusing instead on the new database interface. Soon, Kirk’s voice came over the ship’s speakers.

“Prepare for departure.”

The words were simple, but they sent a thrill up her spine, and she immediately forgot her discomfort. The secondary screens zoomed in on the view ports along the side of the starbase, where station personnel were lined up to watch the Enterprise take flight. Lea had been among the throng of spectators just yesterday, and she remembered the eager anticipation she had felt. And now I’m here! She didn’t bother hiding this smile.

“I better get to my station,” Chekov said. “Let me know if you have any problems.”

Lea thanked him, glad to finally have a few minutes alone with her terminal. She lightly ran a finger along the side of the input panel. “We won’t have any problems, will we?” she said softly, then began reviewing the controls again.

After a few last-minute confirmations, the ship smoothly moved out of space dock. It turned gracefully, Lea noted, so that the people on base would have an unobstructed view of her port side as she glided into position. Lea wasn’t surprised by the showmanship of the maneuver; of course Kirk would choose the most enticing way to show off his ship. Judging by the excitement she could see among the station spectators, they appreciated the gesture. She had to admit, she’d enjoyed it herself yesterday.

Wondering how Kirk was reacting to this attention, she glanced at him, only to find him looking directly back at her. Everyone else was looking at their workstations or the view ports, so she was caught off-guard at his gaze. Again. She smiled to hide her self-consciousness, and he replied with an amused wink. Then he turned to the helmsman.

“Punch it, Sulu.”

Offline ban sidhe

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 11/?
« Reply #62 on: Wed, May 08, 2013, 09:53 AM »
whoo hoo!  You're continuing!

Seems Lea is fitting in better, now that she's relaxing a little.

And of course, Jim is interested.  Can't wait to see if he acts on it.

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 11/?
« Reply #63 on: Wed, May 08, 2013, 11:29 AM »
Thanks, ban! I'm happy to be working on this again. Hopefully I'll get it all posted this time around. :)

Offline Montgomery Burns 13

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 11/?
« Reply #64 on: Thu, May 09, 2013, 12:54 AM »
Quote
Oh, he’s chipper, she thought. Of course, he knows where the coffee is.

Hehe, this made me laugh.  I know exactly how she feels.

Love it.


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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 11/?
« Reply #65 on: Thu, May 09, 2013, 04:28 AM »
Thanks, Monty! I can't seem to write anything without a mention of coffee.

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 12/?
« Reply #66 on: Tue, May 21, 2013, 01:30 PM »
Chapter 12


Thanks to Monty and ban sidhe for the beta!


Scotty looked at Chekov as if he’d lost his mind. “Are ya sure, laddie? That makes no sense!”

“Eet does if you read the notations correctly!” Chekov retorted, his Russian accent coming to the forefront.

“Aigh!” Scotty exclaimed, his own accent growing stronger. “Who can read these crazy scratches? Ya gotta start writin’ your notes in English, laddie!”

Chekov scowled, pushing the diagram aside. “I eat now.”

“Tha’s a good idea,” Scotty replied, shoving a big bite of mashed potatoes in his mouth.

Suddenly, Chekov smiled and waved to someone. “Miss Archer!” he called. “Please join us!”

Scott kicked his young friend in the shin. “What’re ya doin’ lad?” he exclaimed, then immediately hushed his voice. “I don’ want ta be eatin’ with that she-devil again tonight!”

“Oh, Scotty, she’s nice,” Chekov said, rolling his eyes.

“And yer sure about that after spendin’ an entire day with her, eh?” Scotty grumped, but he could see that it was too late. She was walking toward them. Scotty wished he could melt into his chair.

“Good evening, gentlemen,” she said as she approached. “I would love to join you.”

Scotty felt like she was smirking at him, but when he looked up, he saw that she was merely smiling as she took a seat. “I’m glad to have the company,” she continued.

“How did it go today?” Chekov asked excitedly. “Did you like the workstation? Did the interface work correctly? Are you satisfied with the layout?”

Scotty watched as Chekov fired questions at Archer’s niece, apparently not stopping to take a breath. He stifled a sigh; the ensign was so exuberant about everything. He was proud of the new workstation they had built for Miss Archer, and he obviously couldn’t wait to learn how much she liked it.

Unfortunately, he wasn’t letting her answer his questions. “I did--” and “Yes, and...” were about all she’d had the opportunity to say. Chekov was still going, explaining extra features and outlining different possibilities for the interface.

Scotty noted that the woman’s eyes were going wide, and she still hadn’t had a chance to taste her chicken salad. He took another bite of his potatoes, grateful for his friend’s talkativeness. Maybe she won’ pay attention to me, he thought.

But then, after a few more mouthfuls of food, he began to feel a bit sorry for her. Chekov was still talking non-stop, waving his hands as he went, jabbering about god-only-knew-what. Between the thick accent and the rapid-fire topic changes, the young man’s words were practically indecipherable. He knew he should interrupt, if only to give the girl a chance to eat, but he still felt extremely uncomfortable with her. Finally, she smiled and held up a hand.

“Don’t you ever wind down, Mister Chekov?” she asked. He looked at her with confusion, so she clarified. “I mean, don’t you ever get tired? You seem to be going at warp speed all the time!”

He smiled sheepishly. “Doctor McCoy says I am not yet jaded enough.”

Scotty fought a grin, not wishing to let down his guard in front of Archer’s niece, but she laughed out loud. “I see the doctor has a sense of humor,” she said.

Chekov shrugged. “I don’t think so,” he said innocently.

She laughed again, and this time, Scotty joined her. “Aye, lad, he’s got one. It’s just not always obvious to the uninitiated.”

Chekov shrugged. “If you say so.”


***


Lea was starving, so she was glad when she finally had a chance to take a bite of her dinner. Silently, she contemplated the chief engineer. His initial response to her had seemed a bit extreme, but now that she knew why he was uncomfortable around her...well, it still seemed odd.

Honestly, what does he think I’ll do? Even if I decided I hated him, Uncle Jon wouldn’t have him transferred again. Not after everything he’s accomplished here.

She knew she needed to put the man at ease, if for no other reason than to prevent another bizarre incident like the one at last night’s dinner. Already self-conscious among these Starfleet officers, she did not need to have the chief engineer giving her the evil-eye every time she walked into the room.

“So, Mister Scott, I understand I owe you my thanks for the upgrade to my work station,” she began, hoping to break the ice with a familiar topic.

“Oh, yes, well, Chekov is the one to thank,” Scotty stammered, never looking away from his dinner. “He’s the one who did most of the work.”

“That’s not true, Scotty!” Chekov replied. “You’re the one who figured out how to increase the speed.”

Scotty started to protest, but Lea interrupted him with a laugh. “Brilliant and modest. The both of you.”

Chekov beamed, and she noted that Scotty also had a pleased expression, even though he still seemed to be studying his food.

“So, the interface was comfortable?” Chekov asked happily.

“Yes, it’s great,” Lea nodded. “Such a nice surprise.”

“Your specs were easy to follow,” Chekov replied.

“Really?” Lea said. “I’m glad to hear it. The tech staff at Starbase 12 told me my ideas were impossible.”

Scotty responded with a rude noise.

Lea nodded in agreement. She knew her specs were non-standard, but they weren’t that difficult. In fact, she thought she probably could have programmed the basic system herself, given the time and resources. Unfortunately, the staff at Starbase 12 considered anything that didn’t fit within the accepted Starfleet protocols to be “too risky.”

That same aversion to risk was apparent in other areas of Starfleet, too. Sometimes it felt like whole organization was becoming too bound-up by complex rules and over-the-top safety guides. Admiral Pike often said Starfleet was losing its drive, and quietly, her uncle Jonathan seemed to agree.

“Well, I was pretty excited to see that the Enterprise wasn’t put off by my irregular ideas,” she said. “If the starbase staff had been as accepting, I would have asked for a few other features.”

“Really?” Chekov asked eagerly. “What are your other ideas?”

“Not ideas so much as a wish list,” Lea said, suddenly feeling self-conscious. She had studied advanced computing in school, but her abilities didn’t begin to compare to these two geniuses. “I wouldn’t even know how to begin programming it.”

“Sounds like a challenge,” Chekov replied, rubbing his hands together energetically. “Right, Scotty?”

Scott leaned back in his chair. “Maybe,” he said noncommittally, but Lea noted that he was paying attention to her now, rather than his dinner.

“Well, I wish the system could detect and pull information from unrelated databases, without being prompted to do so,” Lea began. “It would also be great if it could intuitively extrapolate information from Uhura’s database, automatically.”

Scotty and Chekov both went silent, obviously thinking about the request.

“Unrelated databases?” Scotty murmured after a moment, rubbing his finger along his jawbone thoughtfully. He was obviously warming to the subject. “That shouldn’t be too difficult.”

“The cultural databases are already set up to maximize shared information,” Chekov mused.

Scotty nodded. “Detecting pertinent information in nearby databases will be easy. The tricky part will be doing it quickly enough to be relevant. With our current technology, it could take up to two minutes to find and highlight important information.”

“Maybe you can rig the transporter to beam the information two minutes back in time,” Lea said jokingly. Chekov laughed, but Scotty’s brow scrunched in thought.

“Uh, that was a joke,” Lea said.   

“Nae, this might have some possibilities,” Scotty replied, tapping his finger on the table.

“Scotty! You can’t be serious!” Chekov exclaimed, but he was smiling expectantly as he said it.

“Wait!” Lea said, holding up a hand. “You’re talking about using the transporter to send information back in time? For real?”

“Why not?” Scotty asked. “We’ve been using trans-quantum computing for generations. This might be the next step.”

Lea had no idea how he thought he could pull this off, but he’d already managed several transporter tricks that no one thought possible. In fact, his experimentation was infamous. Especially within her family.

“Let’s just get something straight,” she said sternly. “When you send this communication back in time -- to me -- it’s not going to blast me into some alternate dimension with my uncle’s dog, is it?”


***


Scotty froze at the mention of the dreaded Archer dog. Warily, he brought his eyes up to meet Miss Archer’s; but instead of malice, he saw only mischief. She was smiling at him.

“Well, I suppose I can test the new system on a potted plant or something, before I test it on you,” he replied.

She laughed. “Oh, that’s considerate of you!”

He tried not to smile, but he couldn’t seem to stop himself.

Offline Montgomery Burns 13

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 12/?
« Reply #67 on: Sat, Jun 08, 2013, 10:08 AM »
Dang, I totally forgot to leave feedback!  I love this.

Quote
it’s not going to blast me into some alternate dimension with my uncle’s dog, is it?

:giggle

Quote
He tried not to smile, but he couldn’t seem to stop himself.

Looks like Scotty's warming up to Lea.  Nice.

Please update soon!!!

Who needs love when you've got a gun, who needs love to have some fun. Black Flag
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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 12/?
« Reply #68 on: Mon, Jun 10, 2013, 06:32 AM »
Thanks, Monty. :)  I wish I could just work on this story and ignore everything else... lol

Offline Montgomery Burns 13

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Re: [Star Trek 2009] A Perfect Universe [NC-17] 12/?
« Reply #69 on: Mon, Jun 10, 2013, 11:00 AM »
I know what you mean.  But unfortunately real life always gets in the way.


« Last Edit: Mon, Jun 10, 2013, 11:06 AM by Montgomery Burns 13 »